How to Make Homemade Lilac Soap (Easy Melt and Pour Soap Recipe)
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How to make homemade lilac soap recipe with lilac oil.  Lilacs can't be directly added to melt and pour soap, but you can use the dried flowers to make lilac oil to make this beautiful swirled melt and pour soap recipe.


In late May, you can't walk anywhere on the farm without smelling lilacs.  The previous owner loved them, so there are about 10 bushes spread around the farm.


I have purple, white, and a beautiful lilac that is both purple and white.  Some of the bushes are 15 feet high and have 100s of blossoms.


A few years ago, I used lilacs to make lilac oil and then used that in a few recipes.  This year, I wanted to show you how to make lilac soap.

   



This is a fairly easy melt and pour soap recipe, but it's a fun swirled soap that will look so pretty to give as gifts or even to sell.


Lilacs have several benefits for your skin.  Unfortunately, their scent doesn't transfer to the infused oil, but their skin benefits do.


How to Make Homemade Lilac Soap Recipe


This homemade lilac soap recipe may not get its smell from lilacs, but it does get the benefits of the lilacs.  I made a swirled melt and pour soap recipe with purple and white for a fun design.


Lilacs have several benefits for your skin, so this is a wonderful bar of soap for your hands or your body.  This beautiful swirled soap is perfect for gift giving or selling.


Lilac Soap Benefits


Lilacs are naturally anti-fungal and antibacterial, so this lilac soap recipe can be beneficial if you have body acne.


Lilacs also work like a natural astringent to tighten the skin and make pores look smaller.  


Lilac oils can promote skin healing and help reduce the signs of aging like fine lines and wrinkles.


How Do You Make Lilac Soap?


To make this homemade lilac soap recipe, I used lilac infused oil.  Unfortunately, there's no true lilac essential oil and you can't add fresh or dried lilacs to melt and pour soap.


So making a lilac infused oil is the best way to learn how to make lilac soap safely with melt and pour soap.  





Can You Add Botanicals or Flowers to Melt and Pour Soap?


The only two flowers that can be added to melt and pour soap are calendula and cornflower.  All other flowers will rot and mold.


Melt and pour soaps can draw moisture from the air.  This extra water can rehydrate the flowers, which can make them grow mold.  


I see so many people add lavender, roses, and other flowers to their melt and pour.  Please don't do this.  The flowers will start to rot, and you'll be washing with rotting organic material. 


Can You Put Lilacs in Soap?


No, you can not add fresh or dried lilacs to melt and pour soap.  They will rehydrate and rot in the soap.  


This homemade lilac soap recipe uses lilac infused oil instead.


Lilac Infused Oil


I made my own lilac infused oil with dried lilacs from my yard.  I have an entire post devoted to how to make lilac oil and its benefits, so click over to read more.


Basically, you will dry the lilacs completely and infuse them in a carrier oil.  It is very important to ensure that your lilacs are completely dry before you infuse the oil.


If lilacs aren't in season, you can buy dried lilacs to make your own lilac oil.  


I used fractionated coconut oil for my lilac oil infusion.  Fractionated coconut oil has a long shelf life of about two years, so my lilac oil will last longer to make more DIY projects.


I also used lilac oil in in my natural after sun lotion to promote healing, and I used lilac infused witch hazel in my lilac infused toner for acne prone skin.





Essential Oils for Homemade Lilac Soap


Unfortunately, there is not a true lilac essential oil.  You may find one for sale, but it isn't an essential oil.  


Lilacs have a short growing season.  Since it takes so many flowers to make the essential oil, the price would be far too high to make it worth making.


There is, however, a lilac absolute.  An absolute is made with solvent extraction, where an essential oil is made by steam distilling a plant.


The solvent can be alcohol or a chemical.  The plant is mixed with the solvent, and the solvent attracts the oils in the plant.  Then the solvent is taken back out.  This leaves the plant oil.


Thankfully, lilac absolute does preserve the wonderful lilac smell.


I used lilac absolute from Crafty Bubbles.  


You can also use a lilac fragrance oil, but it won't be natural.  


You can also make an essential oil blend that smells like lilacs.  Use:



Combine the essential oils in a small bottle and use the same amount as directed in the recipe.


  



How to Swirl Melt and Pour Soap


It's easy to make swirls in cold process soap because the soap is very thick.  However, melt and pour soap is thin so when you swirl, it just combines.


Learning how to swirl melt and pour soap can take some practice and some patience.  You'll need to create two cups of melted soap and color and scent them separately.


Then, you'll need to carefully pour them alternating colors.  You need to let them cool just enough between pours that the layers won't combine, but quick enough that the layers will stick together.


The time can vary between types of melt and pour soap bases.  I use Crafty Bubbles soap, which doesn't set up as fast as other soaps.  If your soap base sets up fast, then you will only want to wait about 3 to 5 seconds between pours.


As you pour more layers and your soap cools, you can reduce the time between pours because the soap will start to set up.


If your soap gets thick, just microwave it for 10 seconds to reheat it and stir well.


For more fun ways to use melt and pour soap, check out my advanced melt and pour techniques.


Lilac Soap Recipe Ingredients


To make this homemade lilac soap recipe, you will need:


        


How to Make Homemade Lilac Soap Recipe


Step #1


Cut the melt and pour soap base into 1 inch cubes.  Divide evenly between two measuring cups.


Step #2


Melt and soap in the microwave in 30 second bursts.  Stir at each interval.  Heat until fully melted.





Step #3


Add purple mica to one melted soap base and silver white mica to the other soap base.  Stir well.


Step #4


Add 25 drops of lilac absolute to each cup of soap.  Add 1 teaspoon lilac infused oil to each container.  Stir well.





Step #5


Pour a small amount of white soap into the mold.  Pour enough to almost fill the bottom of the mold.  Then wait 10 seconds and pour a little bit of purple in.  





Repeat alternating colors and waiting a few seconds between pours until all of the soap base is used. 


If your soap gets too thick, reheat it for 10 seconds and stir well.





Step #6


Let the lilac soap set for about 6 hours.  Remove from mold and use the soap cutting to cut into 1 inch bars.





Now you know how to make lilac soap!  I hope you liked this tutorial.


For more melt and pour soap recipes, check out these posts:



soap, lilac, melt and pour
Yield: 4 bars
Author: Cari @ Everything Pretty
Estimated cost: $10

Lilac Soap Recipe

prep time: 15 Mperform time: 45 Mtotal time: 60 M
How to make lilac soap with lilac infused oil. Easy melt and pour soap recipe.

materials:

  • 1 ½ lbs white melt and pour soap base
  • 2 teaspoons lilac infused oil
  • ½ tsp lavender mica powder 
  • ½ tsp silver white mica powder
  • 50 drops lilac absolute oil, divided 

tools:

  • 4” silicone soap mold
  • 2 - 4 cup microwave safe spouted measuring cups
  • Wooden craft stick for stirring
  • Wavy soap cutter

steps:

  1. Cut the melt and pour soap base into 1 inch cubes. Divide evenly between two measuring cups.  Melt and soap in the microwave in 30 second bursts. Stir at each interval. Heat until fully melted.
  2. Add purple mica to one melted soap base and silver white mica to the other soap base. Stir well.  Add 25 drops of lilac absolute and 1 teaspoon lilac infused oil to each cup of soap. Stir well
  3. Pour a small amount of white soap into the mold. Pour enough to almost fill the bottom of the mold. Then wait 10 seconds and pour a little bit of purple in.
  4. Repeat alternating colors and waiting a few seconds between pours until all of the soap base is used.  If your soap gets too thick, reheat it for 10 seconds and stir well.
  5. Let the lilac soap set for about 6 hours. Remove from mold and use the soap cutting to cut into 1 inch bars.
Created using Craft Card Maker

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Cari Dunn
Cari Dunn

Cari lives on a small farm with her husband, three kids, two dogs, two cats, and a goat. She loves coffee, Gilmore Girls, her chihuahua, and her kids, but not in that order.