04 June 2019

How to Make Lilac Oil, Its Benefits, and How to Use It

While there's no true lilac essential oil, you can get the benefits of these beautiful flowers by learning how to make lilac oil.  Learn how to make it, its benefits, and how to use it.

The previous owner of our farm loved lilacs.  In late May and early June, you can't walk anywhere without smelling their delightful scent of lilacs.  No matter where you are, there's a lilac bush nearby.

We have white, light purple, dark purple, and kind that has both light and dark purple lilacs.  It smells like heaven for about two weeks each year.

How to make lilac oil. Since there is no lilac essential oil, make a DIY lilac oil with a carrier oil or witch hazel.  Use your infused oil in DIY natural beauty recipes.  Lilacs have many uses and benefits in natural beauty.  This spring, pick lilacs to dry to make simple DIY beauty products.  Use hacks like this for natural skincare recipes at home. #lilac #carrieroil #diybeauty

Dakota and I cut them and have lilac centerpieces almost every day during their blooming season.  It's our favorite flower scent of all flowers.  

Lilacs aren't just a beautiful flower, they also have a lot of benefits for your skin.  You can harness their skin properties by making a lilac infused oil that you can use by itself or in other DIY bath and body recipes.

I also made lilac infused witch hazel, which I'll use in an acne treatment later this week.

HOW TO MAKE LILAC OIL


To harness the healing power of lilac oil, you'll have to dry them and infuse them in a carrier oil or witch hazel.  Unfortunately, this doesn't preserve wonderful scent of the lilac, but don't worry; you can get that amazing scent in a lilac absolute. (We'll get to that in a minute though.)

Learning how to make lilac oil is quite easy, but it does take some prep work.  You'll need time to dry the flowers, and then time for the infusion.  This can take anywhere from one to three weeks, so plan ahead.

You could also dry the flowers and save them to make your oil later.  As long as they are completely dried, you can save them for later.

READ How to Make Dandelion Infused Oil

How to make lilac oil. Since there is no lilac essential oil, make a DIY lilac oil with a carrier oil or witch hazel.  Use your infused oil in DIY natural beauty recipes.  Lilacs have many uses and benefits in natural beauty.  This spring, pick lilacs to dry to make simple DIY beauty products.  Use hacks like this for natural skincare recipes at home. #lilac #carrieroil #diybeauty

WHY ISN'T THERE A LILAC ESSENTIAL OIL?


Lilac essential oil causes quite a controversy in the essential oil world.  I'm neither an aromatherapist nor the highest expert on essential oils, but I do a lot of research on oils.

From my research, there is no such thing as a lilac essential oil.  This is due to several factors, namely that the flowers only bloom for about two weeks a year.  This in and of itself would make them too costly for the average consumer.


It's also said that when distilled, lilacs don't smell like lilacs.  So there would be little point in making a lilac essential oil because it wouldn't even smell like the flower. 

The extraction process with either with heat or with a solvent destroys the scent of lilacs.  I infused lilacs in both a carrier oil and in witch hazel, and neither one smells like lilac.  They do have the properties of lilacs though, and that's what I wanted.

That said, you will find lilac essential oils for sale.  I do not know what they are or how they are made, but my guess is that they are actually lilac absolute.

WHAT IS LILAC ABSOLUTE?


Since there is no true lilac essential oil, the next best thing is a lilac absolute.  I have a lilac absolute from Crafty Bubbles, and it's the best way to get a natural lilac scent for making soaps or other DIY beauty recipes.  It also works well in a diffuser.

Essential oils are extracted from the plant material using steam distillation or extraction.  An absolute is made through solvent extraction.  

The solvent can be alcohol or a chemical.  The plant is mixed with a solvent, which attracts the oils in the plant.  Then the solvent is taken out of the oil, leaving behind the plant oil.  

In the case of lilac absolute, this is the only way to extract the lilac scent from the plant because it can't be distilled.  Making an absolute also preserves the scent.  

LILAC OIL BENEFITS


It's a shame that there is no true lilac essential oil because lilacs have many benefits for your skin.  

Lilacs are natural anti-fungal, so it's a great treatment to use topically to fight fungus.  It's also naturally antibacterial, making it great for acne.

Lilacs are a natural astringent.  They can help tighten the skin, make pores appear smaller, and tone the skin.  I'll be using lilacs in a toner for acne prone skin later this week, so check back for that recipe.


How to make lilac oil. Since there is no lilac essential oil, make a DIY lilac oil with a carrier oil or witch hazel.  Use your infused oil in DIY natural beauty recipes.  Lilacs have many uses and benefits in natural beauty.  This spring, pick lilacs to dry to make simple DIY beauty products.  Use hacks like this for natural skincare recipes at home. #lilac #carrieroil #diybeauty

Lilac oil is said to help promote skin healing.  It's a great additive for sunburn relief and after sun care.  It can also help reduce the signs of aging and fight wrinkles and fine lines.

READ DIY Natural After Sun Lotion

Aromatherapy speaking, lilacs are said to boost the mood and relieve anxiety and depression.  It is also said to be relaxing.  

My lilac infused oil doesn't have much of the lilac scent, but you can add lilac absolute for the scent.

HOW TO  MAKE LILAC INFUSED OIL


It's very easy to learn how to make lilac oil, but it will take a few weeks.   I made both lilac infused oil and lilac infused witch hazel.  The process to make both is the same, so follow the same directions for either one.

You'll need some fresh or dried lilacs to make lilac infused oil.  If you can't find any lilacs or they are out of season, you can buy dried lilacs on Etsy to start your infusion.


CARRIER OILS


You can choose any carrier oil to make lilac infused oil.  Just know that if you use coconut oil, you'll have to use the slow cooker method to infuse.  

I used a combination of grapeseed oil and avocado oil to make my infusion.  I'm using my lilac infused oil in an after sun lotion and maybe a foot cream later, so I chose oils for those recipes.  

To learn more about the popular carrier oils, check out my post on carrier oils and their benefits.  Or learn what are carrier oils and how to choose the right ones.

I also have more information in my book Carrier Oils.  In it, you'll find information and benefits on over 40 carrier oils.  




WITCH HAZEL


I'm also making a toner for acne prone skin from my dried lilacs, so I'm also infusing lilacs in witch hazel.  With their antimicrobial and the fact that they promote skin health, lilacs are a great addition to natural beauty recipes.  

I don't have acne prone skin, but I'm going to use the toner for myself as an anti-aging toner and to tighten my pores.  Learn more about shrinking pores naturally if you have large pores like I do.

SUPPLIES AND MATERIALS


DIRECTIONS


STEP #1  


Cut several lilac bunches.  I think I started with 8 full bunches.  Set them on a cooling rack or tie them in smaller bunches of two to three and hang them to dry.


STEP #2


After they are completely dry in about a week, remove the flower petals from the stems.  Discard the stems.

STEP #3


Place the dried flowers in the mason jar and fill no more than 3/4 full.  Do not push them down or compact them.

STEP #4


Cover the flowers with a carrier oil or witch hazel in separate jars.  Make sure that the flowers are completely covered.


STEP #5


To infused them quickly, use a slow cooker.  Place a folded hand towel on the bottom of the crock and fill with a few inches of water.  Place the jars on top of the towel.  The water should cover at least half of the flower mixture.  Be careful not to get water in the oil or witch hazel.


Turn the slow cooker on low and let the water head the infusions for 4 hours.  Do not cover with a lid because it can collect condensation that can drip down into the jars.

You can also do a slower infusion by simply covering the lilacs and oil or witch hazel with a lid and letting them sit up to two weeks in a cool, dark location.  Shake them gently once a day.  

STEP #6


Pour the oil or witch hazel infusions through cheesecloth to strain out the flowers.  Discard the flowers.


You are now left with lilac infused oil and lilac infused witch hazel.


HOW TO USE LILAC INFUSED OIL


You can use your lilac infused oil in any DIY bath and body recipe that calls for a carrier oil.  This would be great for a recipe for promoting skin health or where you would want anti-bacterial or anti-fungal properties.


The first thing I thought of is a foot cream.  I didn't make one because I'm using my dandelion infused solid lotion on my feet, but I am making an after sun lotion and a toner for acne with my lilac infusions.  

Other great recipes for dandelion infused oil are:
Now you know how to make lilac oil, it's benefits, and how to use it.  What will you make?



How to Make Lilac Infused Oil

Yield: 8 ounces
Author: Cari Dunn
Estimated cost: $5
prep time: 1 hourperform time: 4 hourtotal time: 5 H
While there's no true lilac essential oil, you can get the benefits of these beautiful flowers by learning how to make lilac oil. Learn how to make it, its benefits, and how to use it.

materials:

steps:

  1. Cut several lilac bunches.   Set them on a cooling rack or tie them in smaller bunches of two to three and hang them to dry.
  2. After they are completely dry in about a week, remove the flower petals from the stems. Discard the stems.
  3. Place the dried flowers in the mason jar and fill no more than 3/4 full. 
  4. Cover the flowers with a carrier oil or witch hazel in separate jars. Make sure that the flowers are completely covered.
  5. To infused them quickly, use a slow cooker. Place a folded hand towel on the bottom of the crock and fill with a few inches of water. Place the jars on top of the towel. The water should cover at least half of the flower mixture. 
  6. Turn the slow cooker on low and let the water head the infusions for 4 hours. Do not cover with a lid because it can collect condensation that can drip down into the jars.
  7. You can also do a slower infusion by simply covering the lilacs and oil or witch hazel with a lid and letting them sit up to two weeks in a cool, dark location. Shake them gently once a day.
  8. Pour the oil or witch hazel infusions through cheesecloth to strain out the flowers. Discard the flowers.

NOTES:

The flowers should be completely dry before infusing them to prevent mold from growing.

Recommended Products:

diy, carrier oil, infused oil, lilac
Created using Craft Card Maker



How to make lilac oil. Since there is no lilac essential oil, make a DIY lilac oil with a carrier oil or witch hazel.  Use your infused oil in DIY natural beauty recipes.  Lilacs have many uses and benefits in natural beauty.  This spring, pick lilacs to dry to make simple DIY beauty products.  Use hacks like this for natural skincare recipes at home. #lilac #carrieroil #diybeauty









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Cari Dunn
Cari Dunn

Cari lives on a small farm in Ohio with her husband, three kids, two dogs, two cats, five goats, several chickens, and homing pigeons. She loves Gilmore Girls, coffee, and her kids. Not in that order.